Huw Watkins

Huw Watkins

Born: July 13th, 1976
Country of origin: United Kingdom

Upcoming:

Horn Trio
August 11th, 2014 | Imperial College - London - United Kingdom

Concertino
Conductor: George Vass
August 22nd, 2014 | St Andrew’s Church - Presteigne, Wales - United Kingdom

Profile

"In this disc [NMC D164 Huw Watkins: In my craft or sullen art] the listener finds a sensitive and emotive portrait of a composer with the courage to write with clarity of gesture and harmony that lays the music bare. That courage, combined with Watkins’ technique grants the listner immediate access to music with depth of thought and subtlety of execution that continues to reward more deeply on each successive listening” Aaron Holloway-Nahum, Tempo

Huw Watkins was born in Wales in 1976 and studied piano with Peter Lawson at Chetham’s School of Music and composition with Robin Holloway, Alexander Goehr and Julian Anderson at Cambridge and the Royal College of Music. In 2001 he was awarded the Constant and Kit Lambert Junior Fellowship at the Royal College of Music, where he later taught composition.

Watkins’s breakthrough came in 1999 when the Nash Ensemble premiered his Sonata for cello and eight instruments, a year later the BBC National Orchestra of Wales premiered Sinfonietta under Grant Llewellyn and later commissioned his Piano Concerto which was premiered in 2002 with the composer at the piano.

This wider attention led to commissions from the London Symphony Orchestra (London Concerto, to mark their centenary in 2005) and a Double Concerto premiered by Philip Dukes (viola) and Josephine Knight (cello) at the Proms with BBC NOW conducted by Jac van Steen. He also received his first US commission from the Cincinnatti Chamber Orchestra which resulted in Nocturne for horn and chamber orchestra. His widely acclaimed Violin Concerto was premiered by Alina Abragimova at the 2011 Proms.

Alongside this growing body of orchestral music is a wealth of chamber music which is central to Watkins’ output, complementing his parallel career as a pianist. He has written two string quartets as well as a number of works for artists with whom he has developed performing partnerships including his Cello Sonata for Paul Watkins (recorded for Nimbus), Partita for Alina Ibragimova (recorded for NMC) and a viola Fantasy for Lawrence Power. The Nash Ensemble have long been supporters of his music and his recent Horn Trio was written for them. His Piano Trio was commissioned by Vernon Ellis for The Florestan Trio, who have performed it widely.

Watkins is also building a body of vocal works that includes In my craft or sullen art for tenor and string quartet which Mark Padmore and the Petersen Quartet premiered at the Wigmore Hall in 2006. Three Auden Songs was commissioned at Mark Padmore’s request by La Monnaie in 2009 and Five Larkin Songs, premiered by Carolyn Sampson and the composer at the 2010 Weekend of English Song, went on to win the vocal category at the British Composer Awards. 2009 also saw the premiere of Crime Fiction, a 20 minute chamber opera with a libretto by David Harsent for Music Theatre Wales. MTW subsequently co-commissioned with Scottish Opera In the Locked Room, a 50 minute chamber opera again with a libretto by Harsent, which was premiered in August 2012 to much acclaim.

As one of the UK’s finest young pianists Watkins has premiered works by Oliver Knussen, Mark-Anthony Turnage, John Woolrich and Michael Zev Gordon and has performed concertos with the BBC Symphony Orchestra and Orchestra of the Swan. His recordings include discs of contemporary British music for Nimbus and Usk, the piano cycle Symmetry Disorders Reach by Alexander Goehr for Wergo and music by Knussen for NMC. His own disc of chamber music, In my craft or sullen art with NMC has been warmly praised.

Watkins is currently Professor of Composition at the Royal Academy of Music and has been appointed as the Royal Philharmonic Society and PRS for Music Foundation’s Composer in the House with Orchestra of the Swan from 2012 until 2014 during which he will be writing a number of new works.